Jeff Prom's SQL Server Blog

Sharing knowledge and tips on SQL Server, Business Intelligence and Data Management.

Generating Dynamic CRUD Queries Within Microsoft Excel

Posted by jeffprom on February 21, 2014

Last year I learned a neat trick from Ross McNeely. We kept getting ad-hoc Excel documents sent to us and we needed to update the databases with these values. Traditionally you might go through the import/export data wizard, or create an SSIS package to import the data. This usually leads to data conversion issues, possible temp tables, writing extra queries, and somtimes all around headaches.

This method shows how to write CRUD sql statements within Excel that can then update the database. This is a really quick way to take a handful of fields and update data with little effort. If you have a lot of fields you may want to consider going the more traditional route because it could take some time to write long query statments in Excel. That said, I have used this technique probably 100 times so I decided to post about it. Let’s take a look at how it works.

I have two examples here that will update two tables in the Adventure Works DW database. Let’s pretend that someone has just sent us an Excel file and needs product information updated in the DimProduct table. This is what the data looks like.

First, find an open cell off to the right (F) and begin writing the sql query as shown here. Begin with =” and place single quotes where the sql statement will require them. In order to reference other data from the row, place double quotes, an ampersand and then the cell location. To continue the rest of the statement simply place another ampersand and double quote.

Continue until the rest of the statement is complete. Here is what it should look like:
=”update DimProduct set EnglishProductName='”&B2&”‘, StandardCost='”&C2&”‘, FinishedGoodsFlag=”&D2&”, Color='”&E2&”‘ where ProductAlternateKey='”&A3&”‘”

Once finished, click off of the query statement. If it worked correctly you should now see the query populated with values. If you received some errors, go back and double check the statement. Syntax issues are the most common mistakes.

Now that we have one statement that looks correct, let’s quickly fill in all the other rows. Single click the cell with the query (F2), and then double click the green square on the lower right. This will populate the rest of the rows with the same query template.

After the rest of the rows are populated, you should now have a complete set of queries.

One last trick to note is when using dates. You will need to use the text() function as shown here and specify a date format.
=”update FactInternetSales set ShipDate='”&TEXT(C2,”yyyy-mm-dd”)&”‘ where SalesOrderNumber='”&A2&”‘ and SalesOrderLineNumber=”&B2

The final step is to copy the query statements from Excel and paste them into SQL Server Management Studio where you can simply execute them to update the database. In the previous screenshot you would click on column D, copy, and then paste into Management Studio, and execute.

And there you have it, writing queries directly within Excel provides a quick way to take data from an Excel spreadsheet and manage data within your database with very little effort.

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